Your mother’s skincare shelf is a mysterious place. And I’m going to tell you all about it.

We males have it easy. Usually we only need one or two products for skincare, and so that big shelf of women’s beauty products is still alien to most of us. We have no idea how all those creams and powders and potions work. Why, we guys can exfoliate just by scraping a razor over our faces. It’s havoc for your skin moisture if not done right, yet it’s quick and it feels manly. But that’s a story for another blog.

Mother’s Day has just been, but as the person who brought you into the world, she could always do with your appreciation. You can generally give your mother skincare products without any risk of offending her. Who else gets that honour? Your lover? Maybe. Your workmates? That’s weird. But Mum will appreciate a cream or a mask.

So, what does a woman over 40 need for healthy skin? Is it really so different to yours?

The short answer is yes.

What’s the difference?

Female skin is 25% thinner. After menopause, the skin thins even more.

Men of every age have more collagen, one of the ingredients in many SkinB5 products. Collagen makes the skin look younger. People over 30 lose 1% of their collagen every year – double that for women after menopause.

Men are more prone to acne. At the same time, male skin is better hydrated, which is why it’s more important for women to use moisturiser.

Basically, women put on all those creams for good reason. It’s because they dry out quicker and their skin ages faster, especially in middle age.

Inside the medicine cabinet

Research says that the older a woman grows, the more she spends on beauty products. The biggest users are between ages 50 and 70. Middle aged women are even getting braces more than anyone else.

So, what are some of these concoctions?

Foundation is usually a powder that you put on with a round brush, but it can come in liquid form too. It smooths the complexion. Concealer and BB balm are similar but made for covering blemishes. Face powder, rouge, contour, highlight, finishing powder, primer (you can also get lip primer which goes under the lipstick) and bronzer all go over the top. Setting spray and setting powder keep them in place.

Tweezers are for the eyebrows mostly, although the hormonal changes of menopause can thin out the hair – and make it appear in new places. That’s right, women pluck out their own hair all the time.

The little black eyebrow pencil neatens the brows. Eyeliner goes on the base of the lashes. Mascara makes the lashes dark and pretty. Eyelash curler … does just that. Then there’s eyebrow gel (like hair gel), fake lashes and eyelash glue.

Lipstick. Goes on the lips, makes them fun colours. Simple and elegant. Lip stain is similar. You can get lip gloss and lip booster to keep the lips smooth and lip pencils, which are eyebrow pencils for your lips I guess. Plumper swells up the lips by irritating them because why not, you’re already tweezing out your face hairs. And you thought guys were tough.

Cleanser cleans the face and helps dry skin. Cleansing wipes are the same deal and are a simple way to remove makeup. Many cleansers contain vitamins. As we know, this means they’re healing the skin in ways that many cosmetics can’t. Face oil is similar to these, as is moisturiser, a cream that helps the skin retain water, vitamins, and minerals.

Face mask. Yep, another cream. Usually. Our 5-minute Skin Purifying Mask goes here.

Supplements such as our Acne Control Caplets and Acne Control Extra Strength Tablets. This is where SkinB5 shines.

Nail polish, like you wore to that rock concert once.

This is some of what your mother uses every morning in the time it takes you to shower. She’s a cosmetic ninja, so be nice to her.

 

Peter Matthews headshot

Peter Matthews is a runner, serial weight loser and son. He really likes tea even though he lives in Melbourne where there is one tea house for every billion cafes (give or take). His favourite B vitamin is B6, the one that may give you vivid dreams.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:http://www.dermalinstitute.com/us/library/16_article_When_Razor_Meets_Skin_A_Scientific_Approach_to_Shaving.html